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Construction, Manufacturing and Repair Operating Guidelines

These guidelines are effective as updated on June 29, 2020 in St. Louis County. In accordance with the St. Louis County Department of Public Health’s (“DPH”) Second Amended Order for Business and Individual Guidelines for Social Distancing and Re-Opening, dated June 26, 2020 and effective June 29, 2020 (the “Order”), these guidelines may be replaced or modified by DPH based on new scientific information and local information including the trajectory of influenza-like illnesses, cases of COVID- 19, and any other information deemed relevant to protect public health in St. Louis County.

  • Jun 25, 2020

Construction, Manufacturing and Repair Operating Guidelines

 

These guidelines are effective as updated on June 29, 2020 in St. Louis County. In accordance with the St. Louis County Department of Public Health’s (“DPH”) Second Amended Order for Business and Individual Guidelines for Social Distancing and Re-Opening, dated June 26, 2020 and effective June 29, 2020 (the “Order”), these guidelines may be replaced or modified by DPH based on new scientific information and local information including the trajectory of influenza-like illnesses, cases of COVID- 19, and any other information deemed relevant to protect public health in St. Louis County.

These guidelines are intended to apply to the construction industry, manufacturing facilities, and residential repair services. Substantially similar businesses and industries may also utilize these guidelines as appropriate.

These guidelines do not replace or supersede any requirements applicable to your business or licensed employees pursuant to law or regulation.

 

The broad principles that together prevent the spread of infections by respiratory transmission (including COVID-19) include:

  • Social distancing: maintain at least 6 feet between and among employees and other individuals at all times.
  • Monitoring employee health: screen employees for symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Using personal protective equipment (PPE): staff and other individuals must always wear a mask, except while eating.
  • Disinfecting and cleaning: wash hands regularly and clean surfaces with an EPA-approved disinfectant.

Employee health

  • Upon arrival at work, employees must be masked, and employers must conduct health checks (e.g., temperature and symptom screening) of employees at the start of each shift. Conduct health checks safely and respectfully, and in accordance with any applicable privacy laws and regulations. Employers may use examples of screening methods in CDC’s General Business FAQs as a guide.
  • Screening should include:
    • a temperature check with a touchless thermometer
    • asking about the presence of cough, shortness of breath, fever, chills, muscle ache, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell
    • asking if the employee has had close contact with a person diagnosed with COVID-19 in the past 14 days
  • Employees with a temperature of 100.4°F (38°C) or above, or who answer yes to any of the screening questions, must not be allowed to enter the workplace. Employees who develop any symptoms of respiratory illness while at work must immediately be sent home. Employees with symptoms should contact their healthcare provider for additional guidance.
  • Employees who are sent home with symptoms should not return to work until they have met DPH’s criteria to discontinue home isolation or quarantine or they have been cleared to return by their healthcare provider.
  • If an employee is diagnosed with COVID-19, work with local health agencies to ensure all employees and customers who can be identified as having had close contact while the employee was infectious are contacted. Compile a list of employees or other people known to be in close contact with
  • the person diagnosed with COVID-19. Employees identified as having close contact should be immediately sent home or told not to come into work until the investigation has been conducted.
  • Close off indoor areas recently used by an employee or customer who has tested positive for COVID- 19 and do not reuse them until after cleaning and disinfection. Wait 24 hours before cleaning and disinfecting. If it is not possible to wait 24 hours, wait as long as possible.
  • Employers must provide employees with all protective equipment needed including face coverings, or materials to make them.

Construction Site Best Practices

  • Each job site must develop cleaning and decontamination procedures that are posted and shared.
  • These procedures should cover all areas including trailers, gates, equipment, and vehicles, and should be posted at entry points to the site and throughout the project site.
  • Contractors or other staff must not ride together in the same vehicle. If riding in separate vehicles is not possible, limit the number of individuals and distance as much as possible (e.g. individual sits in driver seat while individual sits in back right cab). If individuals ride together, each individual must wear a face covering.
  • Eliminate handshaking and reduce physical contact between employees where possible.
  • Consider conducting meetings that must take place indoors via conference calls. Individual work crew meetings/tailgate talks should be held outside and follow social distancing requirements. Keep all crews a minimum of 6 feet apart at all times to eliminate the potential of cross contamination. In work conditions where required social distancing is impossible to achieve, employees must wear face coverings.
  • Employers must revise shifts to avoid person-to-person transmission. For example, eliminate routine shift hand-off meetings that are not critical, stagger shift start/stop times and breaks to minimize congregations, and create new shifts (nights or weekends) to help separate the workforce. In addition, zone the site and prohibit employees from wandering into zones where they are not needed.
  • Employees should leave all personal items, including reusable bottles or cups, in designated areas or vehicles. Employees should not touch their cell phones or other personal items during work. If they do, they should stop and wash or sanitize their hands. If possible, provide employees bottled water instead of shared water coolers. Provide sanitizing wipes to clean personal items.
  • All enclosed common areas and meeting areas must be cleaned and disinfected at least twice per day. Use products that meet EPA criteria for use against COVID-19 and that are appropriate for the surface. Prior to wiping the surface, allow the disinfectant to sit for the necessary contact time recommended by the manufacturer. Train employees on proper cleaning procedures to ensure safe and correct application of disinfectants.
  • Restroom facilities/porta-potties must be cleaned at least daily, and handwashing stations should provide soap, hand sanitizer, and paper towels. Train all employees on the importance of hand hygiene and give them clear instruction to avoid touching hands to face.
  • Install hand-washing stations at outside construction sites without ready access to an indoor bathroom.
  • When an employee enters a machine, vehicle, or lift and is not sure he/she was the last person to enter, instruct the employee to wipe down the interior and door handles with disinfectant.
  • If the site includes elevators or lifts, limit the number of individuals based on the size of the elevator.
  • Encourage elevator occupants to disperse among the four corners of the cab. Lifts/elevators and should be cleaned daily.
  • Promote the use of stairwells to cut back on elevator use. In multi-story buildings with multiple stairwells, designate one stairwell as up and one as down to prevent contact.
  • Train employees and post signage to avoid congregating during breaks. Give extra breaks throughout the day for hand-washing.
  • Designate a superior who employees can go to in order to discuss COVID-19 guidance and report issues with guidance implementation.

In-Home Repairs

  • On the day of the job, call ahead and ask the customer if they or any occupants have symptoms of, have been diagnosed with, or have had recent close contact with a person who has COVID-19, and to check that they are comfortable with your visit to take place.
  • If the customer answers yes to any of these questions, reschedule the service for at least 14 days later if possible. If service must be performed within 14 days, ask the customer to always remain in another room from where the work is to be done and ask the customer to wear a face covering. When working in such a space, the technician should wear an isolation (surgical) mask, gloves and face shield or goggles.
  • When on the job, technicians must wear protective equipment such as gloves, goggles, face shields, and face coverings as appropriate for the activity being performed. Regardless of the activity performed, technicians must always wear a face covering.
  • Before entering and after exiting a home/workspace, technicians should disinfect any tools and equipment that were used. Use products that meet EPA criteria for use against COVID- 19 and that are appropriate for the surface. Prior to wiping the surface, allow the disinfectant to sit for the necessary contact time recommended by the manufacturer. Train employees on proper cleaning procedures to ensure safe and correct application of disinfectants.
  • Prior to service, provide technicians with disinfectant so they can wipe down/clean any surfaces with which they may come into contact.
  • Refrain from shaking a customer’s hand and maintain at least 6 feet of distance during the service visit.
  • To prevent any unnecessary close contact avoid collecting a signature at the end of the job, where possible.

Manufacturing Best Practices

  • Allow as many employees as possible to work from home by implementing policies in areas such as teleworking and video conferencing. When this isn’t possible, employees should keep six feet distance from all other employees and visitors.
  • Post signage at facility entrances stating that no one with a fever or symptoms of COVID-19 may be permitted. Consider prohibiting nonessential visitors to the factory or plant. Essential visitors should undergo screening and be limited in their movement at the facility.
  • All employees must wear face coverings at all times except when working alone in an enclosed space.
  • Employees should leave all personal items, including reusable bottles or cups, in designated areas or lockers. Employees should not touch their cell phones or other personal items during work. If they do, they should stop and wash or sanitize their hands. If possible, provide employees bottled water instead of shared water coolers. Provide sanitizing wipes to clean personal items.
  • Eliminate any meetings of more than 10 individuals. Instead, employers should conduct multiple, smaller group meetings and physically space employees out during those meetings by using physical markers on floors or walls.
  • Employers must revise shifts to avoid person-to-person transmission. For example, eliminate routine shift hand-off meetings that are not critical, stagger shift start/stop times and breaks to minimize congregations, and create new shifts (nights or weekends) to help separate the workforce. In addition, zone the facility and prohibit employees from wandering into zones where they are not needed.
  • Ensure key personnel and those without whom the factory cannot operate (e.g., boiler operators, wastewater treatment engineers, lead electricians, maintenance, etc.) are able to maintain six feet of distance from others to prevent them from getting ill.
  • Facilities must increase the frequency and depth of sanitizing efforts, and letting employees see them happen to reinforce sanitizing behaviors. For example, facilities should clean and sanitize break rooms after each break or lunch group. In addition, facilities should provide sanitary wipes and train employees on proper cleaning procedures to ensure safe and correct application of disinfectants.
  • Frequently perform enhanced environmental cleaning of commonly touched surfaces, such as workstations, countertops, railings, door handles and doorknobs. Use products that meet EPA’s criteria for use against COVID-19 and that are appropriate for the surface. Prior to wiping the surface, allow the disinfectant to sit for the necessary contact time recommended by the manufacturer. Areas that should be frequently disinfected include:
    • Machine control panels
    • Tow motor and other vehicles
    • Packaging centers
    • Shipping/receiving offices and docks
    • Locker rooms
    • Restrooms
    • Break/lunch rooms
    • Time clocks
    • Administrative offices
    • Air conditioner coils and drip pans
    • Shared computers, telephones and office supplies
  • To further increase cleanliness and sanitation best practices, leave all doors open, or even remove them, to eliminate shared touch surfaces. Check with fire department and ventilation experts before implementing this action.
  • Ensure all staff are provided appropriate protective equipment. All equipment should be assigned to a particular employee to eliminate shared contact.

Adapted from the STL Regional Business Recovery Initiative